Additional Information

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Eco Calculation

 Level of connection
Very Frequently
Frequently
Intermittently
Infrequently
Recharge discharge processes
Detains water
Flood mitigation
Potentially connects aquatic ecosystems
Regulates waterflow - groundwater
Regulates waterflow - overland flows
Physical Processes (Sediments)
Trap fine sediments
Retain fine sediments
Releases fine sediments slowly
Trap coarse sediments
Retain coarse sediments
Releases coarse sediment slowly
Transports material for coastal processes
Sediments, Nutrients, Chemical
Debris, DOM and rock
Biogeochemical processes
Primary production
Secondary production
Source of (N,P)
Uptakes nutrients
Regulates nutrients
Carbon source
Sequestors carbon
Regulates carbon
Source DOM
Salinity regulation
Regulates temperature
Biological Processes
Habitat refugia for aquatic spp
Habitat for terrestrial spp connections reef
Food source
Habitat ecologically important for animals
Replenishment ecosystems colonisation
Pathway migratory fish
Pollination
Habitat contributes sign recruitment

Eco Calculation

The Ecological Processes Calculator (Eco-Calculator) is a tool for assessing the changes to ecological processes provided by coastal ecosystems, that support the health and resilience of the Great Barrier Reef.

The calculator scores the current capacity of ecosystem services, per catchment, against that of pre-European condition. When combined with the Blue Maps tool, the calculator can be used to forecast the impacts of improved practices on ecological processes, as a tool for restoration planning.

Ecological processes provided by coastal ecosystems are critical for the long-term health and resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. Ecological processes include biological, biogeochemical and physical processes. For example, coastal ecosystems such as wetlands trap water, allowing biofilms and aquatic algae to grow and assimilate heavy metals.

They also allow sediments to settle and nutrients to be cycled. Wetlands slow down the velocity of overland flows, allowing greater groundwater recharge and more residual time for ecological processes to occur. They are important habitats and refugia for species connected to the Reef.